Fusuma(襖) Fusuma are Japanese sliding panels that are typically made of wood … The two characters, tan and su, appear to have initially represented objects with separate functions: the storage of food and the carrying of firewood.Since the radical for bamboo appears in each of these characters, it may be conjectured that wood … Tansu were rarely used as stationary furniture. I’d find that interesting, right along with you. Japanese Minimalist Furniture, Japanese Bedroom, Japanese Living Room, Japanese Sofas, Haiku Designs is your source for Japanese Furniture. There are few workshops producing tansu in imitation of the classic antiques due to the high cost of materials and the very low prices of secondhand tansu. Japanese design is also characterized by the use of certain traditional elements that are still popular in any modern room designed with a Japanese style. – Chuck Paukert. So, while I don’t imagine that much inexpensive Asian furniture is made of U.S. lumber, it probably isn’t out of the question. The two characters, tan and su, appear to have initially represented objects with separate functions: the storage of food and the carrying of firewood. Haiku Designs offer the best of Japanese Style Furniture and Asian inspired home decor products. There were several main kinds of furniture that could be found in traditional Japanese homes. Well into the Meiji period, when a sengokubune (1000 koku ship) would arrive at a coastal town for trading, the crew would ceremoniously off load the captain/owner's personal tansu to be then positioned strategically at the place where negotiations would be held, thus lending a calculated air of affluence and respectability to the visitor's aura. Stanford JGuide - Crafts & Antiques section, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tansu&oldid=973171269, Articles containing Japanese-language text, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 15 August 2020, at 19:47. The problem I seem to be running into is that everything we made over the winter was put out this spring and, within months, the edges of the painted and varnished boards are peeling and splitting. During the time period in which tansu gradually became a feature of Japanese culture and daily life, 1657–1923, both hard and softwoods were used by tansuyas (tansu craftsmen), often in practical combination for a single chest. Traditional Japanese interior design elements. With the enforced closure of the country in 1633 and a prohibition against the construction of ships with a keel, more than two masts and a cargo capacity exceeding 89,760 liters (2550 bushels) in 1636, the shōgun inadvertently crippled the transport of rice grown on Japanese lands, resulting in shortages and even riots in some urban areas. The furniture is usually stamped “made in Malaysia” or “made in Thailand.” I don’t think it is bamboo. Consistent with Japan's minimalist aesthetic, traditional homes appeared rather empty. Funa-dansu evolved into three categories of design: Funa-dansu that were intended for shipboard use were always constructed of Keyaki for all exterior exposures with Kiri for interior compartments and drawer or box linings. Among his implemented recommendations was the designation of reliable sea transporters of government rice as goyochonin (merchants representing the interests of the shogunate). Literally meaning ship's chests, this often exotic cabinetry was used by the captain or owner of small coastal trading vessels licensed by the feudal shogunate to transport rice. So the question is: what wood (or woods) are predominantly used in relatively inexpensive furniture that comes from the Pacific Rim? There is evidence that from the Kyōhō era of Edo (1716–1735), specific designs of elaborate cabinetry began to be used on the kitamae route. Though most certainly an inducement to shipping traders, there was a physical constraint that stood in the way of predictable success. Those become premium veneer that’s then sold, to some extent, back to the U.S. market. The ships, though impressive in construction, were usually under 90 feet in length, with a scant crew of eleven or less. Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). So the question is: what wood (or woods) are predominantly used in relatively inexpensive furniture that comes from the Pacific Rim? I see a lot of furniture, especially tables and chairs, made from wood that has the appearance of oak. Because the joinery of cases was simple and thus flexible to facilitate structural integrity during movement from place to place, hardware placement at vulnerable points was consistent with the need for reliability. Complexity A traditional sukiya-style teahouse appears remarkably simple, composed of a straightforward wood post-and-beam structure with mud-plaster walls and a few small openings.Yet this intentionally humble structure, which dates back to the late-16th century, is anything but simple. Tansu is the traditional mobile storage cabinetry indigenous to Japan.Tansu was first recorded in the Genroku era of the Edo period (1688–1704). The increased number of Japanese wood abandoned were also a trigger to increase the number of people suffering from hay fever affected by the pollen in the forest. For lacquer (Rhus verniciflua), application could be only for sealing the plain wood to enhance a natural visible grain or for the creation of a perfect opaque surface.[21]. Since the radical for bamboo appears in each of these characters, it may be conjectured that wood was not as yet used.[1]. Hi Golam, here are some Japanese woods, used in interior work and furniture, I can list in addition to the ones mentioned by Jim: -ichi-i: Japanese Yew, popular for carving in the Hida region -akamatsu: red pine, a very common construction timber -tsuga: a relative of Hemlock, also used in construction -enju: pagoda tree; also a source of dye For a dry finish, clay or chalk powder was rubbed into the soft wood surface (kiri, sugi or hinoki) then burnished with an Eulalia root whisk. The grain is quite pleasing. Tansu (箪笥) is the traditional mobile storage cabinetry indigenous to Japan. Birch is close-grained. Besides volume sales, how else would the manufacturers make money if not by using the most economical materials possible, right? These vessels would travel from the bountiful but remote countryside to the teeming cities on the kitamae route between Osaka and Hokkaido through the Inland Sea and up the Japan Sea coast. Tansus & trunks, medicine cabinets and storage chests, coffee and end tables, consoles and buffets, sofa tables, stands, stools, and pedestals, and much more. A lumber supplier I used to buy from who also was in the veneer business once told me that the best logs on the market often are sold to China. Butternut: This hardwood, often called white walnut, is similar in many ways to walnut. [20], Tansu finishes fall into two categories: dry and lacquered.