In the above sentence, consider the clause “When I was coming from the office“. It is an adjective clause.) It can make you write and say things better and that will be easier to understand for the people you are communicating with. Here is an example of a dependent clause acting as an adjective: The car that your wife sold me last week has broken down. Here are examples of dependent clauses that are adverb clauses: Adjective clauses modify nouns and usually begin with a relative pronoun and sometimes with a subordinating conjunction. -, sentences express a complete thought or not, Complete and Incomplete Sentences — Definition and Examples, Balanced Sentences — Usage and Examples. Similar to an adverb, an adverbial clause is an dependent clause that modifies a verb, an adjective clause, or another adverb clause in a sentence. If you can give me two reasons, I will allow it. Dependent clause examples: When I was coming from the office, I saw my friend waiting for the bus. However, it does not express a complete thought unlike that of a sentence. 4. This type of dependent clause is also known as Relative Clause which basically functions similarly to an adjective that in essence also modifies a noun or pronoun. The trophy goes to whoever wins the race. It does not express a complete thought so it is not a sentence and can't stand alone. 4. The Adverbial Clause. 3. 1. The Adjective Clause. What the girl did was not unacceptable to the rest of the group. If my mom is niceWhat happens if mymom is nice? Adverb clauses modify verbs and begin with subordinating conjunctions. Dependent clauses can act as adjectives, adverbs, or nouns. In addition, since an adjective clause acts as an adjective, it answers to questions such as which, what, whom, who, etc. (The dependent clause that your wife sold me last week describes the car. It adds information or modifies a verb of the main clause in terms of time, frequency, condition, cause and effect, and intensity. Jeffrey finally finished his thesis paper, after months of research. These conjunctions are used in an adverbial clause signifying a cause and effect: because, since, now that, as long as, as, so that, etc. However, you need to remember that some of these words can also be used to introduce adjective and adverbial clauses; therefore, a clause can only be considered as a noun clause only if you can replace/substitute a pronoun (he, she, it, they) in its place. A dependent clause, sometimes also called as a subordinate clause, is a group of words with a subject and verb. When you have a group of words that form their own sentence, all by themselves, we call this an independent clause. Here are examples of dependent clauses that are adjective clauses: Noun clauses name a person, place, thing or idea. A helium nucleus has two protons, whereas hydrogen only has one.  Here are some examples of an adjective clause: 100,000+ Designs, Documents Templates in PDF, Word, Excel, PSD, Google Docs, PowerPoint, InDesign, Apple Pages, Google Sheets, Publisher, Apple Numbers, Illustrator, Keynote. Listed below are some examples of an adverbial dependent clause: It is important that you know how to identify the differences between an independent and dependent clause, not only because it is necessary but also because it can improve your communication skills. Where is the tub of chocolate ice cream that was in the freezer? 7. For example, in the following sentence there is a main clause..., a dependent clause in an adverbial relationship with the main clause (in italics), and a dependent clause [bold italics] in an adverbial relationship with the first dependent clause: If you want to survive the elements when you go hiking, …